Sunday, August 13, 2017

Hunterdon Prosecutor asked to allow OPRA requests to be submitted electronically.

The following letter was sent by Libertarians for Transparent Government, a non-profit I serve as executive director, to the Hunterdon County Prosecutor's office.  At issue is that office's insistence that OPRA requestors submit their requests only by hand-delivery or regular mail.
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Deborah D. Factor, First Assistant 
Hunterdon County Prosecutor's Office
65 Park Avenue
Flemington, NJ 08822-0756
Via fax to 908-806-4618 and e-mail to prosecutor@co.hunterdon.nj.us

RE: Open Public Records Act

Dear First Assistant Factor:

Your office's on-line instructions to the public on how to submit an Open Public Records Act (OPRA) request do not provide a way for those requests to be e-mailed or faxed to your office.  Rather, the page states that "[o]nce fully completed, the request form can be mailed or presented in person to the Hunterdon County Prosecutor's Office."   Your OPRA form itself states that "[t]he completed request form may only be either mailed or hand-delivered."

Your office's requirement that citizens use only hand-delivery or U.S. mail to submit OPRA requests is not only out-of-step with the way people communicate in the 21st Century, but also runs afoul of the Government Records Council's (GRC) September 29, 2015 decision in Dello Russo v. East Orange, GRC Complaint No. 2014-430.  In that case, the GRC held that East Orange's "policy of banning submission of OPRA requests electronically represents an unreasonable obstacle on access."  It held that while the City did not need to accept OPRA requests by both fax and e-mail, it must accept some form of electronic submission.

Would you please amend your OPRA form and instructions so that they conform to the GRC's holding?

Very truly yours,

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Wall Township school board sued over refusal to disclose yearbook invoice.

On August 3, 2017, Libertarians for Transparent Government (LFTG) filed a lawsuit against the Wall Township Board of Education challenging its refusal to disclose an invoice from Jostens, the high school's yearbook vendor.

On June 19, 2017, LFTG requested a copy of Jostens' invoice regarding its production of the 2017 high school yearbook.  The request was made because one of the student's photographs in the 2017 yearbook was altered so as to remove references to Donald Trump.  As a result, some of the yearbooks have been reprinted at a cost of $10,000. The school board has claimed that no public funds were used for the reprint.  In response to LFTG's records request, the school board confirmed that an invoice existed but denied access claiming that the invoice was protected by the deliberative process privilege.  In his June 19, 2017 denial, Board Secretary Brian J. Smyth stated that "the invoice has not been reviewed and approved for payment [thus it] is exempt while the district deliberates as part of the review."

The lawsuit is captioned Libertarians for Transparent Government (LFTG) v. Wall Township Board of Education and Brian J. Smyth, Docket No. MON-L-2848-17 and LFTG is being represented by Walter M. Luers of Clinton.

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Identity of one of the cops who shot Radazz Hearns has been confirmed.

On October 15, 2015, both Keith Brown of NJ Advance Media and Isaac Avilucea of the Trentonian reported that State Police Detective Doug Muraglia was one of the two officers who together fired as many as eighteen shots at Radazz Hearns, then age 14, on August 7, 2015.   The other officer who fired at Hearns was identified by the newspapers as Mercer County Sheriff’s Detective James Udijohn.

Yet, when I asked the Attorney General's office to confirm that Muraglia and Udijohn were indeed the shooters, it refused.  So, with the help of Hackensack attorney CJ Griffin I filed an Open Public Records Act (OPRA) lawsuit that sought the names of the two officers who opened fire on Hearns.  On June 30, 2016, I prevailed before Mercer County Assignment Judge Mary C. Jacobson and the State appealed.

Because of the Supreme Court's recent decision in North Jersey Media v. Lyndhurst, the State, likely realizing that it was going to lose its appeal, decided to give me one Use of Force Report that identifies Muraglia as having fired his weapon.  I am hopeful that the State will soon confirm the other officer's identity and drop its appeal.

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Appeal taken from Burlington County ruling that 3 year old unapproved meeting minutes are "deliberative" and thus not subject to OPRA.

On May 26, 2017, Burlington County Assignment Judge Ronald E. Bookbinder issued a written opinion holding that the minutes of an October 19, 2012 public meeting of the Moorestown Ethical Standards Board were "deliberative" and thus exempt under the Open Public Records Act (OPRA) at the time I requested those minutes on December 28, 2015--more than three years after the meeting was held.  Judge Bookbinder deemed the minutes "deliberative" because the Board had not yet "approved" them at the time my OPRA request was received.

In his ruling, Judge Bookbinder found that the Ethical Standards Board did violate the Open Public Meetings Act (OPMA) by not making its meeting minutes "promptly available" to the public.  He ordered that the Board, going forward, "must annually approve and release all prior unapproved meeting minutes at its required reorganizational meeting" and that "if the Ethics Board receives a request for copies of its prior meeting minutes before this deadline, then the Board must convene a Special Meeting within thirty (30) days of the request in order to approve and release the requested minutes."

Through attorney CJ Griffin of Hackensack, I have appealed Judge Bookbinder's ruling.  I believe that meeting minutes, because they simply record what happened during a meeting, are not "deliberative" and are therefore public records at the moment they are created and regardless of whether or not they are "approved."  Also, it is important that people are able to enforce their OPRA (rather than OPMA) rights for unapproved meeting minutes because only OPRA (and not OPMA) requires the custodian to reimburse a successful requestor his or her attorney fees.

Background on the case and copies of court documents are available at my March 3, 2016 blog article.